What works well in dyslexia / dyspraxia coaching: the Mobile Phone

Today I would like to share a simple and powerful strategy that continuously supports my clients to be on time and to remember to do things.

The mobile phone

Whether for personal or work use, this small device has the power to help you be organised.

Set reminders for things. Set them as soon as you know that this is something you need to do i.e. booking a GP appointment for Tuesday at 10am – set the reminder as you make the appointment. This will stop you relying on your memory to remember to book reminders.

Depending on your mobile phone as to when you plan in the reminder for. So back to our GP appointment at 10am. You may need to be up at 8am, so set your reminder for setting your alarm clock. You may need to leave at 9am so set a reminder to leave the house at 0855am.

Give yourself time to succeed. Getting things achieved early can give a great sense of achievement.

One of my clients books in everything to her mobile phone. She uses it to manage her health with medication, get the children to school, get the washing done, and take rest breaks and to start and finish her work shift on time. This means she feels calmer more often and finds it easier to get things done.

Regularly looking at what is coming up and setting reminders can make life easier to manage.  But putting too much in can make you feel overwhelmed, so save this strategy for the things you might forget.

Top three tips:

  1. Stop what you are doing and take the action on the reminder straight away or edit the time and date for your next convenient window
  2. If you can only set an alarm on your phone, have a note in your diary for what the action is you are going to do.
  3. Set the reminders and do things at the best time where possible. So, if you need to get going on paying bills after dinner – avoiding any procrastination then set your reminder for finishing dinner at 630pm. Or if you work best in the morning, do the tricky stuff then.

For more information on your mobile phone, refer to the user guide that came with it.

If you can’t find that, look at the manufacturer’s i.e. HTC’s website.

Or call your phone company or get a knowledgeable friend to help you.  You can even go into most phone shops, such as Orange or Vodaphone, and they’ll help you work it out.

If you receive instructions which are not written down, write them/type them/mind map/sketch them/ voice record them for future reference.

It sounds simple because it is!  So many of our Genius Within clients rely on their mobiles (with data backed up) and so do we.  I like to think of it as my spare memory.